Art @ The Max is a rotating, multi-year exhibition that brings visual art created by Detroit-area artists to three levels of the William Davidson Atrium at the Max M. and Marjorie S. Fisher Music Center. Made possible with the generous support of the Applebaum Family Foundation, Art @ The Max aims to broaden audience engagement at the DSO and to elevate the unique contribution of local artists in Detroit’s cultural enrichment.

If you are interested in purchasing one of these works, please concert Goode Wyche – gwyche@dso.org or 313.576.5162. A portion of the sale price of these works will benefit the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.

Click here to download the Art @ The Max VI self-guided tour program.

MADE POSSIBLE WITH THE GENEROUS SUPPORT FROM:
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First Floor Atrium

Oil on canvas, 2013

Mel Rosas (b. Des Moines, IA, 1950)

Mel Rosas’s paintings — which he thinks of as “fictions” — are each the culmination of a lengthy process of travel, observation, documentation, and imaginative recontextualization. Their imagery is collaged from photographs the artist makes on regular research trips to Latin America, solo excursions during which he roams, eavesdrops, takes copious notes and pictures, and ultimately enters an “almost transcendental state.”

The portal is one of Rosas’s dominant motifs, puncturing again and again the richly textured walls that tend to fill his compositions.

Edited from an essay by Matthew Piper. To read more see Installment #58 at essayd.org.

la-excursion.jpg

Modified ping pong table, paint and mixed media, 2011/2019

Graem Whyte (b. Royal Oak, MI, 1970)

In Venue for Advanced Conflict Resolution, artist Graem Whyte asks what would happen if you faced an adversary for a game of ping pong on a table with multiple inclined surfaces?

To read more on Graem Whyte see Installment #43 at essayd.org.

Venue-for-Advanced-Conflict-Resolution.jpg

Oil on panel, 2015

Mel Rosas (b. Des Moines, IA, 1950)

Mel Rosas’s paintings — which he thinks of as “fictions” — are each the culmination of a lengthy process of travel, observation, documentation, and imaginative recontextualization. Their imagery is collaged from photographs the artist makes on regular research trips to Latin America, solo excursions during which he roams, eavesdrops, takes copious notes and pictures, and ultimately enters an “almost transcendental state.”

The portal is one of Rosas’s dominant motifs, puncturing again and again the richly textured walls that tend to fill his compositions.

Edited from an essay by Matthew Piper. To read more see Installment #58 at essayd.org.

The-Day-of-the-Panther.jpg

Second Floor Atrium

Acrylic on canvas, (from the Color Moves series 2015 - present)

David Rubello (b. Detroit, MI, 1935)

Veteran painter David Rubello sees color as an expression of pure emotion. Best known for the iconic Color Cubes mural that stood on the side of a downtown Detroit high-rise from 1973 to 2014, Rubello's prolific, half-century long exploration of the relationship between visual perception, emotion, and hard-edged geometric abstraction shows no sign of slowing down.

In this exhibition we are pleased to present three new works from Rubello's current Color Moves series. The word Moves in the title has a double meaning, referring both to color's ability to move people, and also to the “moves” (i.e. changes in his ever evolving artistic strategy) that Rubello continues to make with every new painting.

Color-Moves-17.jpg

Acrylic on canvas, (from the Color Moves series 2015 - present)

David Rubello (b. Detroit, MI, 1935)

Veteran painter David Rubello sees color as an expression of pure emotion. Best known for the iconic Color Cubes mural that stood on the side of a downtown Detroit high-rise from 1973 to 2014, Rubello's prolific, half-century long exploration of the relationship between visual perception, emotion, and hard-edged geometric abstraction shows no sign of abating.

In this exhibition we are pleased to present three works from Rubello's current Color Moves series. The word Moves in the title has a double meaning, referring to both color's ability to move people, and also to each painting being Rubello's latest “move” in his constantly evolving artistic strategy.

Color-Moves-87.jpg

Acrylic on canvas, (from the Color Moves series 2015 - present)

David Rubello (b. Detroit, MI, 1935)

Veteran painter David Rubello sees color as an expression of pure emotion. Best known for the iconic Color Cubes mural that stood on the side of a downtown Detroit high-rise from 1973 to 2014, Rubello's prolific, half-century long exploration of the relationship between visual perception, emotion, and hard-edged geometric abstraction shows no sign of abating.

In this exhibition we are pleased to present three works from Rubello's current Color Moves series. The word Moves in the title has a double meaning, referring to both color's ability to move people, and also to each painting being Rubello's latest “move” in his constantly evolving artistic strategy.

To read more on David Rubello see Installment #12 at essayd.org.

Color-Moves-88.jpg

Third Floor Atrium

Oil on canvas, 2013

Mel Rosas (b. Des Moines, IA, 1950)

Mel Rosas’s paintings — which he thinks of as “fictions” — are each the culmination of a lengthy process of travel, observation, documentation, and imaginative recontextualization. Their imagery is collaged from photographs the artist makes on regular research trips to Latin America, solo excursions during which he roams, eavesdrops, takes copious notes and pictures, and ultimately enters an “almost transcendental state.”

The portal is one of Rosas’s dominant motifs, puncturing again and again the richly textured walls that tend to fill his compositions.

Edited from an essay by Matthew Piper. To read more see Installment #58 at essayd.org.

la-carreta.jpg

Found objects and housepaint, 2015/2019

Rose E. DeSloover (b. Monroe, MI, 1940)

Artist, educator, and former Catholic nun Rose E. DeSloover believes that the color Kryptonite possesses a protective energy, and utilizes it extensively in her life and artwork.

In Kryptonite Wares, DeSloover transforms an abandoned cupboard and miscellaneous dollar store items into a concentrated burst of that energy.

To read more on Rose E. DeSloover see Installment #8 at essayd.org.

Kryptonite-Wares.jpg

Single channel video (1 min 38 seconds), 2018

Ash Arder (b. Flint, MI, 1988)

In untitled (mean wind) a series of soundless slow-motion video fragments show jazz musicians blowing what we assume are wind instruments. By removing both the sound of the instrument and the instrument itself, we are prompted to focus on the origin of the sound in the musician's breath.

The word “mean” in the title might be thought to indicate a serious quality to the playing (i.e. he plays a mean horn) but the artist is also referencing mean (or average) wind, a technical term used in computer simulation.

untitled (mean wind) is one of a series of works made by Arder in which she attempts to create a personal set of relationships between the scientific world and (black American) culture by translating sterile technical terms into symbols and concepts she can understand.

To read more on Ash Arder see Installment #130 at essayd.org.

Untitled-mean-wind.jpg

Single channel video (24 min 1 second) and archival inkjet print, 2015

Scott Hocking (b. Redford, MI, 1975)

In his remarkable “Barnboat” project, artist Scott Hocking took an historic barn, located near the tip of Michigan's thumb, and inverted it to create what he termed a “celestial ship,” or “emergency ark.”

In this exhibition we are honored to present the first public showing of the video that Hocking created to document the project.

To read more on Scott Hocking see Installment #13 at essayd.org.

Scott Hocking is represented by the David Klein Gallery. For more information on available work please contact christine@dkgallery.com.

Celestial-Ship-of-the-North.jpg

Skateboard ramp top surface, paint, and skateboard marks, 2019

Paint - Robert Sestok (b. Detroit, MI, 1946)
Skateboard ramp – Ramped Construction (Detroit)
Skateboard marks – Community Push Skateboard Collective (Detroit)

In August 2019, the DSO’s Sosnick Courtyard was the venue for a unique event in which jazz pianist and MacArthur “Genius” Jason Moran, along with his trio The Bandwagon, improvised a simultaneous performance with local skateboard collective Community Push. The skateboard ramp was created for the show by Detroit’s Ramped Construction, and the top surface was decorated with free-flowing artwork by legendary Cass Corridor artist Bob Sestok. Over the course of the evening, the skateboarders added their own marks creating a unique record of the event, which Jason Moran described as “practice in public.” We are pleased to be able to display the resulting artwork, Rhythm Ramp, as a testament to this multi-dimensional creative project.

Rhythm-Ramp.jpg

Fourth Floor Atrium

Ink, alginate, pump, panels, and time, 2012/2019

Megan Heeres (b. Battle Creek, MI, 1979)

In Home. HomeGrown, ink solution cascades through a series of approximately conical cups onto a panel mounted horizontally below. This is art that makes art, exposing the moment during which the panel begins the transition into a “completed” work. By unmasking the process in this way, Heeres hopes to reduce the psychological divide between the viewer and the artist.

To read more on Megan Heeres see Installment #46 at essayd.org.

Home-HomeGrown.jpg